Articles – Brutalist Architecture

Articles – Brutalist Architecture

Articles and Books

“4. Sink Estate Spectacle”,  Ben Campkin
In: Remaking London: Decline and Regeneration in Urban Culture, Campkin. London: I.B. Taurus, 2013.

“Bodies in Space: Architecture and the Films of Stanley Kubrick”, Shelton Waldrep
In: The Dissolution of Place: Architecture, Identity, and the Body, Waldrep. London: Routledge, 2016, 165-206.

“Introduction”, Catherine Croft
In: Concrete Architecture, Croft. London: Laurence King Publishing, 2004,. 15-23.
Source: https://books.google.de/books?id=UVRlfzWEnFIC&pg=PA20&lpg=PA20&dq=brutalist+architecture+england+sociology&source=bl&ots=E0RAHTB8AL&sig=i2naJScsGG7zJyE8MakwHTCJvkc&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjVuZuFrfbSAhUHuRQKHYVADe8Q6AEIRTAJ#v=onepage&q=brutalist%20architecture%20england%20sociology&f=false
Accessed on: 27 March 2017

“Britain has gone to war with brutalist architecture – should Dublin? – A British minister called it a ‘cult of ugliness'”, Paul Hosford
In: thejournal.ie, 2016.
Source: http://www.thejournal.ie/brutalist-architecture-3083001-Dec2016/
Accessed on: 27 March 2017

“Brutalist Architecture: An Autoethnographic Examination of Structure and Corporeality”, Roy Brockington and Nela Cicmil
In: M/C Journal, 19.1 (2016),
Source: http://journal.media-culture.org.au/index.php/mcjournal/article/view/1060
Accessed on: 27 March 2017

Brophy, Gwenda. “Fortress Barbican.” The Telegraph, 15 Mar. 2007.
Source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/property/3357100/Fortress-Barbican.html
Accessed on: 27 March 2017
Additional Information: “By the time the Barbican was completed, the 1980s, with their cult of the individual, were in full swing – but from the start, the City’s ‘residential village’ was designed to resemble a cohesive, small walled town. The concentration of buildings was high, but a creative layering of space, with car parking underneath the apartments, as well as landscaped areas, gardens and lake, and its infamous pedestrian walkways away from street noise, gave the Barbican a sense of space – the feeling of being in an oasis.
[…]
Peter Driscoll says: “The success of the Barbican over the past decade, in particular, is a testament to the original city planners and project architects.” Now a landmark on the City’s skyline, in 2001 the Barbican was listed as a site of special architectural interest for its scale, ambition and cohesion. But for its residents, Barbican living is an addiction, says author David Heathcote.”

Clement, Alexander. Brutalism: Post-War British Architecture. Marlborough: Crowood Press, 2012.

Hanley, Lynsey. Estates: An Intimate History. London: Granta, 2012.

“High Rise Dreams.” Time Shift. BB4, Bristol. 19 Jun. 2003.

Moran, Joe. “Housing, Memory and Everyday Life in Contemporary Britain.” Cultural Studies 18.4 (2004): 607-27.

Power, Anne. Hovels to Highrise: State Housing in Europe Since 1850. Taylor & Francis, 2005.

Singh, Anita. “Lord Rogers Would Live on This Estate? Let Him Be Our Guest.” The Telegraph, 20 Jun. 2015.
Source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/art/architecture/11687078/Lord-Rogers-would-live-on-this-estate-Let-him-be-our-guest.html
Accessed on: 27 March 2017.
Additional Information: “Residents of blighted Robin Hood Estate challenge Lord Rogers to stay with them after the architect said he would ‘absolutely’ live there.”

The Great British Housing Disaster. Dir. Adam Curtis. BBC Documentaries. BBC, London. 4 Sep. 1984.

Examples of Brutalist Architecture

“London’s Top Brutalist Buildings”, Londonist
In: Londonist (2012)
Source: http://londonist.com/2012/05/londons-top-brutalist-buildings
Accessed on: 27 March 2017

“11 lesser-known Brutalist buildings that helped define the movement”, Michael Abrahamson
In: dezeen (2014)
Source: https://www.dezeen.com/2014/09/14/fuckyeahbrutalism-top-11-brutalist-buildings/
Accessed on: 27 March 2017

Grossman, Susannah L., “Demolition Men: Contemporary Britain and the Battle of Brutalism” 17 March 2010. CUREJ: College Undergraduate Research Electronic Journal, University of Pennsylvania.
Source: http://repository.upenn.edu/curej/113
Accessed on: 27 March 2017

“The Long Read: The Fall and Rise of the Council Estate”, Andy Beckett.
In: The Guardian, 13 July 2016.
Source: https://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/jul/13/aylesbury-estate-south-london-social-housing
Accessed on: 27 March 2017

“Housing estates: if they aren’t broken…”, Rowan Moore
In: The Guardian: Architecture, The Observer, 31 January 2016.
Source: https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2016/jan/31/council-estates-if-they-arent-broken-lambeth-council-central-hill-estate-social-housing-affordable
Accessed on: 27 March 2017

“Housing in crisis: council homes were the answer in 1950. They still are”, Rowan Moore
In: The Guardian: Cities, The UK housing crisis, 30 April 2016.
Source: https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2016/apr/30/housing-crisis-council-homes-are-the-answer
Accessed on: 27 March 2017

Jones, Paul (2002) “Architecturing Modern Nations: Architecture and the State”, G. Delanty and E. Isin (Eds.), Handbook of Historical Sociology. London: Sage. 301311.

Jones, Paul. The Sociology of Architecture: Constructing Identities. Liverpool: Liverpool UP, 2011.

—–

Featured Picture: Eros House
Location: Catford, London, England, 1960
Architect/Company: Rodney Gordon, Owen Luder Partnership
Description (from source): Eros House was the first major work by master Brutalist architect Rodney Gordon for the firm led by Owen Luder. The stair tower features continuous glass ribbons clad in translucent structural panes that reduce climbers to blurred silhouettes. Its asymmetrical arrangement became default for the many buildings of this type produced by Luder’s firm, though none came close to matching Eros House’s heady mix of Constructivist faktura and New Brutalist literalism.
Gordon would go on to design other infamous buildings for Luder including Trinity Square and Derwent Tower in Gateshead along with the Tricorn Centre in Portsmouth, all of which have been demolished over the past decade. Eros House is listed, but renovations have reduced the impact of its once daringly transparent facades.
Source: https://www.dezeen.com/2014/09/14/fuckyeahbrutalism-top-11-brutalist-buildings/
Accessed on: 27 March 2017

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